Skip to main content

About your Search

News 17
Today 11
( more )
WJZ (CBS) 27
WRC (NBC) 19
( more )
English 425
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 425 (some duplicates have been removed)
thoughts on the use of them domestically here in the united states. if you support their use for a wide variety of purposes, here is how you can give your support -- oppose their use 00 -- you can tweet us -- we had about 30 people chiming in before the start of the program. you could also send us an e- mail. it is the association of unmanned vehicle systems international. this story and convention is the featured story here on the front page of the wall"options and times" --ngton news" talks about their use in the united states and reaction to them -- that is the opinion on the use of drones in the united states. the topic for first half hour. we want to get your thoughts on their use. call on the line that best represents you and be prepared to tell us why. use, 202-t thethe us 585-381. out to how you can reach us. available too. i see novans saying problems using them for military operations but do not think they should be used again surveillance -- civilians under any circumstances and they should not be allowed to be used for any individual to target another individual
and the actions of the syrian forces in the administration's view. he says the use of chemicals is many question when the united states will act with force. force,say beyond any strategy is needed on syria. i want to get your reactions this morning again to the situation in syria and what the secretary of state said yesterday in what the u.s. should do and whether congress may or may not be involved as well as the international community. here are the lines on the screen. here is the front page of "the washington post" this morning. obama weighing limiting strike on syria. they say the president is wearing a strike syria that would be a limited scope and duration, designed to serve as punishment for serious use of chemical weapons and as a deterrent while keeping the u.s. out of deeper involvement in that country possible war. this according to senior administration officials. the timing of such an attack which would probably last no more than two days and involve -- lawrence cruise missiles and involve see launch cruise is dependent on three factors. completion of an intelligence report assessi
that we let those who represent us on capitol hill, those who represent us in our communities, knowing that we are a force to be reckoned with. many of our messages today target today's youth and our elders. i look specifically at those new parents, our young professionals, youthful educators, and community activists. they are young enough to relate, but also established in our community, and i ask you, how will we bridge that gap? what are our next steps? because this country, in the area of civil rights, has certainly taken a turn backwards. am i depressed? no. i am energized to move forward and to be sure to see the gains that we have encountered and had to come to us, that we have had to work so hard for, are not lost. so i do ask you, one of our next steps, we created a framework, but there is so much work to be done. many of our civil rights leaders, including my husband and dr. martin luther king, were still of an age when they took the lead. with that question and mind, i challenge you to get back to community building. it is your problem, it is our problem, it is our neighborh
of us know this is the true place, the mother ship. [applause] so i wanted to start this morning by paying tribute. the reality tv rush hour-free zone, which is one of its appeals. now, i can't claim and i am not a true native chataquan like many of you, that go back four, five, seeven six generations. in fact, i grew up outside of boston, massachusetts. i am a patriots fan. admittedly behind enemy lines here in buffalo bills territory. but i was born in buffalo general hospital. so, mr. president, i'd like to apply again for citizenship in chaw tack qua nation. -- chautauqua nation. i'm pleased to be discussing diplomacy. i'm glad that chautauqua has decided to spend some time talking about this venerable art, sometimesis understood, stiemsma lined, but always important as diplomacy. i'm a former career american diplomat. i served five presidents between my first job. i was the lowest ranking person in the u.s. government. i was an intern at our ambassador in mauritania in west africa in 1980. until my last job as undersecretary of state in 2008. and you now have the privilege o
not just the civil rights movement but it reminds us of who we are as americans. >> what is the dream? was delivered right here. imagine what it was like to be here 50 years ago. hundreds of thousands of people came together to be part of a call to action.there were rumors that coming here would be dangerous. there were fears that nobody would show up. in the end, it was a success because people believed in the power of standing for something. that speech by dr. king was not called, "i have a dream." it was called, normalcy never again. it was about opportunity for all people. >> it was about looking forward to where we need to go as a country, which reminds me of one of my favorite quotes from 50 years ago. he said, the future does not belong to those who are fearful of gold projects and new ideas, but it longs to those -- belongs to those who can blend passion and courage. >> in 1963, i was in the mind of god, as my mother would say. my parents, an interracial couple, knew the importance of the message that was delivered here. their marriage in 1958 was illegal in the state where th
the canals to bring the water to us, we wouldn't be but this is a desert. there would be a few people here but not all of us certainly. the great megalopolis grown here in phoenix and los angeles, all of those areas wouldn't have the growth that has if we don't pay attention to the importance of using the river anymore sustainable way. that's been huge challenge and a look at 100 years of a rivers history, and i've only seen some real hope towards the end of that 100 years, and beyond, and the 21st century where starting to pay attention of a crisis before we look for reasonable solution. but looking at the whole picture, looking at the whole picture of the river helps us understand yes, why we exist the way we do here in the southwest. it also helps us understand the role of rivers surface water in arid regions, and other parts of the world. but it also gives us a larger picture, a piece of a larger picture of how humans relate to the environment and the stresses and strains that come along with it or the political fights that hamper, creating a sustainable relationship, all of the barrie
after the march on washington, let us remember that dr. king's last march was never finished. the poor people's campaign was never finished. some 50 years after the march on washington, while if you were -- you are people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off everyday. say that thean distance between a child's aspirations represented by the top of that letter and a family situation at the bottom of that is the exactder measurement of that aaron's level of frustration. as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. as we turn on our tvs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they are being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom. at the top of that letter has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. let us not just be dreamers. let us recommit to be doers. thank you, and god bless. [applause] >> from dest
.c., event sponsored by the u.s. chamber of commerce. we take you to it now. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> klees be sure when you get the mic to identify yourself when the time comes. thank you. >> it is a pleasure to be here today. i'm glad all of you were able to make it with so much going on around the world. it seems that a little thing like the economy probably would not attract that much attention, so thank you for being here, and if i see you all run for the doors in the middle of this, i will know that something is biggern that is somewhat than what we are discussing here today. we're going to talk a little bit about the u.s. economy, where it has been, where we think it is going. and that a little bit about the labor markets sensitive labor day. when you look at the economy today, unfortunately what you see is an economy that now for four years has not been doing very much. we have grown at an average pace of 2.2%, as you can see from the chartered has not really been up or down. it was not as f
is going to be very you can expect where democrats are in the majority, 54 of us, right, and where there was a willingness to get it done, do expect something out of the house of representatives that is better, from an ideological point of view, it will be more difficult. it is what i think. people, -- youe legalize people, they got to get a job, right, where there is healthcare. we know the american people to their health care through their employment, 80%. they will have more opportunities to get employment. their wages will increase, which means their ability to buy better food, to have a saner life, i mean, the stress that must be on those communities of people, the housing they have to live in. economic social and standards that will improve, but they will have to rely on emergency care because that was what was adopted in the senate. even though there is more than enough money saved according to cbo, instead of spending $45 billion over the next 10 years amount we spend $45 billion putting more control agents on the border. those are the decisions we are going to make. they a
of patients using drivingy rooms in america are utilization. at the medicaid -- you leave a message no one calls you back. there are no appointment available. that's before the expansion. it's going get even worse as time goes forward. it's mapping out the claims on a map five years of data mapping out the home address of every resident and this is only nine square miles a small community. 6% of the city blocks are 10% of the line mass, 18% of the patients, 27% of the visits and 37% of the cost. it's just theroom room and hospital care. all over america they are living collected in buildings. many of which you are funding through state funds and federal funds. these are the two most expensive in the city. these are beautiful buildings with great management. 600 parents who are mostly dual eligible. these are disabled seniorsed at $12 million in payment for the care to go bark over and over to the hospital. the building at the bottom. 300 patients a nursing home 300 patients had 15 million in payment to got hospital. we have mapped out data all over the cub now and found the same pattern
we have a text in epidemic. how can we use the recent sensors and mapping and technologies that are available in robotics to have the car drive itself? that is moonshot thinking. maybe you can't get their right away. you have a mercury mission and then jim and i and apollo. it's about a year. this is the prototype, isabel for the glass designer. by the way for the prototype, the first prototype they built they did it not in a month but a year-and-a-half they put it together. why couldn't school be like that, but set apart and do the design thinking then we start projects and businesses? we think 10x better, not 10%. when we are working with something two-thirds what can i do to move forward in what is the critique? a third, yes. this is a place we just wanted people to celebrate moonshot thinking. also looking more historical yet who already made it but let's celebrate the people taking decrease the risk. hear the proposals and help them to try to move the world for word and moonshot radical proposals. last i guess i would end on - it's so important to help kids find their
and mitch the senate republican lear mitch mcconnell. it was held at u.s. capitol. here's a portion of the event that runs just under an hour. we are back live at 11:00 eastern time with the ceremony on the mall on the steps of the lincoln memorial. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable nancy pelosi. >> good afternoon. thank you for bringing us together for this congressional bipartisan observance of the 50 year anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to ac
's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song. >> i don't know about you, b bbu but -- ♪ i woke up with my mind stayed on freedom ♪ >> and even celebrities joined in echoing dr. king's words. >> and as the bells toll today at 3:00, let us ask ourselves how will the dream live on in me and you and all of us? >> and those bells did toll. on the national mall and all over the country, they rang to commemorate dr. king's call to let freedom ring. and then on the very same steps from which dr. king addressed the country decades earlier, president obama brought the point of today home. today is not just about commemorating the dream, but advancing it. because those who came before us worked too hard, sacrificed too much for us not to keep working. >> through setback
the way i think. host: john hickenlooper is joining us for mill walking, where the nga summer meeting is gathering -- from milwaukee, where the nga summer meeting is gathering. >> tomorrow, we will talk with michael harpster. he is with the fbi unit talking about child prostitution around the country. then tough insurance rates with kaiser health news and senior correspondent phil galloway -- galewitz. and we are heading now live to milwaukee for the final day of the national governors association meeting will be getting underway shortly. it is expected to start any moment now. the chair of this year's hearing l. governor markel the next session that they will be dealing with is the closing session, the state and cybersecurity. "the washington post" talks about why waiting for promised to fix cybersecurity is a waste of time by brian fung. it says that the commerce committee approved a version of the cybersecurity bill that now heads to the senate floor. but the bill is a sign of how timid lawmakers have become on the issue compared to previous attempts. as the just watch governors ga
the merger between american airlines and us airways. host: good morning, expected in egypt by those supporting the ousted president there. repeated violations of privacy rules by the nsa thomas calling for operations of the program. at a state justice in pennsylvania has blocked a voter id law there. this is in time for the november 5 special election. journal," ahington three-hour program for you. our first 45 minutes is looking at politics, looking to you specifically on this topic am a who best represents your political party? the rnc concluding its summer meeting, talking about its future as far as 2016 is concerned. visits to iowa by joe biden. for the first 45 minutes we want to hear from the people that best represents your political party. divided the lines by political party. if you want to give us a tweet on this topic you can send that our way@c-spanwj. send us an e-mail at journal@c- couple ofurred by a different things. "the wall street journal" has a new writeup about the rnc meeting. the head of the rnc talked a little bit about the 2016 strategy. in this w
with: we asked taxpayers if they should foot the bill. >> i would probably say no. >> people told us given the fact he is convicted of leaking classified materials taxpayers shouldn't have to pay for any gender therapy for privatehera manning. >> my opinion is you forefet any rights to benefits from the taxpayer. >> manning is expected to serve his term at the military prison at fort leavenworth, kansas which does not offer hormone or gender reassignment surgery. >> the antiperspirant went on te tell us all inmates are considered soldiers and treated with access to mental health professionals including adi psychiatrist, psychologist andst social worker and behavioral science expert and manning's lawyer says a legal fight will be launched to get manning the therapy demanded in the letter. >> tom fitzgerald thank >>> wetz asked facebook fans whw they thought: thought: >> go to a settlement reached in it the lawsuit against bob filner. the question tonight will it include his resignation. >> details of the settlement were kept private ahead of the closed doo
be risking their lives as a privilege to service us. so you have to be careful with that. of you're right, david. look, in new york, 95% of every public employee doesn't con trent a nick to their -- contribute a nickel to their retirement. that is not okay. we have to be careful. we have don't need to scrap the programs. we have c't forget about people working the career to respect the pension but time to reform them. >> david: that is the question. how do you do it? detroit won't be the only city that goes bust. >> yeah, the problem is, unless it does file bankruptcy, citys cannot disscrap most of the plans because they he state constitutions that say they can't do that. of the they have to know goshate with thenions to do it. what they should start with is having the 401(k) plans for the new workers and try to get the higher interest rates to annuityize what the obligation has been far and cap it in the future [ the problem is with the public sector unions. they're not beholden to the taxpayers, we who pay the bills. they're beholden on the politicians. politicians rely on them to get
even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic internet? that doesn't correspond with her democratic understanding of what it should be. what does that look like? we don't know the entity that yet. >> to finish on myanmar, burma, this would be a wonderful experiment for all of us to watch. 18 months ago, the generals either for self interested reasons are good public policy reasons, they allowed on cenci to become the future leader of the country, i'm sure she will. they have now taken a lot of press -- press restrictions on. the underlying hidden tensions in the so
,ning, it is august 30, 2013. even as the british parliament voted not to join the u.s. in a possible strike. while administration officials said last night that the u.s. is considering taking unilateral action in response to a reported chemical weapons attack on syrian civilians and rebels last week, some congressional leaders said the white house has more work to do in making its case. as we take you through the latest developments this morning, we want to hear your opinion on what you think the american public needs to know before america -- before president obama takes action. give us a call on the republican democrats, and independents, the numbers are listed on the screen. if you are outside the u.s., it 585-3883. you can also catch us on twitter and facebook or e-mail us. a very good friday morning to you. i want to take you right to the headlines about syria and possible u.s. involvement today. here's the front page of "the new york times." to one of those british newspapers, "the guardian," out of london. prime minister said report shows damascus behind gas attacks. "the the front page of
>> alisyn: good morning, everyone. today is august 3rd. i'm alisyn camerota. thanks for joining us bright and early. we begin with a fox news alert for you because the state department issues a worldwide travel alert and shuts down embassies across the middle east after a terror threat. we have all of the latest for you from washington. >> and so much for civility and colored blindness. charlie rangel goes on a racist rant calling the tea party a white cracker. should the liberals condemn these comments? >> a scary wakeup call, why not sleeping through the night signal something more serious about your health. this is "fox & friends" and it begins right >> alisyn: good morning, everybody. thanks to much for joining us. peter johnson jr. in for clayton this morning. >> peter: good morning. >> alisyn: great to have you back, tucker. we is missed you. >> tucker: thank you. >> alisyn: a fox news alert we start with because there are some new details emerging on the al qaeda terror threat. shutting down 21 u.s. embassies tomorrow. and it has led at the a worldwide travel alert for ameri
, everybody. great to see you today. thank you for joining us here and welcome to the "full court press." we are your morning talk show. three hours of town hall here. monday through friday coming to you live on current tv. our job is to tell you what's going on this morning both here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe and your job is to tell us what you think about it all. you can do so by just picking up the phone early this morning, giving us a call at 1-866-55-press. or you've probably already been tweeting this morning. come to us on twitter at bpshow. and on facebook, join us at big question on facebook, we'll tell you all about this morning. in the news today, the major league baseball dropped the hammer yesterday finally on a-rod suspending him for 211 games. he's allowed to play while he appeals that decision. in fact, he played against the white sox in chicago last night. 12 other players were slapped with 50 game suspensions starting immediately. the white house is defending, keeping 19 embassies closed in the middle east f
know, we rely basically on physician groups to tell us how many hours it takes to give various services. but there was a washington post or new york times article, i forgot which -- i think it was a washington post -- that showed that for certain specialties the doctor would have had to work over 24 hours a day to equal the number of hours that they had, were charged with. so we've got to get a better handle. and the people who are being disadvantaged under the current system are primary care. and that's what we have to fix. and you're exactly right. if we're going to get the right mix, the right work force mix, then we have to have the right reimburse bement structure. and a lot of that means let's replace the sgr which was not part of the affordable care act. it's a separate issue that we clearly have to deal with. i'm going to ask a question, if i might, jay, and that is -- [inaudible conversations] [laughter] >> those of you that have to sort of figure out in advising people how to enroll in the exchanges, i don't know if you've had a chance yet to take a look at the type of plans t
. and get back to nature. that's what camping is about. thanks for joining us. america live starts right now. >> we begin with a fox news alert. the world reacting to horrifying reports of a chemical weapon's attack in syria. claims that hundreds of people may have been killed or injured. welcome to america live. i am shannon green in for megyn kelliy. the white house holding a briefing saying it is deeply concerned about the reports. they have a emergency meeting of the security council less than two hours from now. the syrian regime denied that it is using chemical weapons, but the opposition released a video. we have to warn you a head of this this may be tough for viewers to walk. it is limp people carried in a hospital. and it is a blood loss and cut through this. and we can't independently confirm the video and it is way too disturbing and including images of toddlers and possibly dead children and lifeless bodies lined up on the floor and hearing eyewitness accounts of people foaming in the mouth and convulsing. leland viters has the latest on this. >> hi, shannon, late tonight upward
is an issue of our national security, regional security, and global security. the u.s. rejects the use of chemical weapons by assad or any other regime. we are following this story and will continue to bring you coverage. we will post any documents released today on the alleged chemical attack against syrian civilians on our website, www.c- of the most fun times i ever had was -- it was 2006. it looked like democrats were going to take over, take back over the house, it was looking pretty bad for republicans. vice president cheney's office called and wanted to know if we could come over and have breakfast. we went over and had breakfast. before, it is unbelievable how much he knew about individual -- he had been to so many of these districts over the years as one of your republican leaders of the house. he was asking us how bad is this. , it is saying, yea pretty bad. that is fun when you get to do that, talk to the caucuses, you get a glimpse of the inside of the players. >> more than 30 years as a political analyst, charlie cook has uncovered trends and covered sincecongres
case i can think of no more sophisticated than r.c. hobbyists using. host: jeremy up next from lawrence, kansas. independent line. caller: yes. i think that everybody wants the emerging technology to be used for the safeguarding of people and public servants of good faith. the issue becomes the footing that is taken and in this case the kind of technology the footing taken by the federal government is a replication of the footing taken when the federal government started working with local law enforcement around the alleged war on drugs, which is militaristic that inputs weapons of war and tools of war and a footing of that type into the hands of law enforcement. so, i would ask your guest to comment. when we see the actual implementation of federal law with these drone technologies, it is being done -- the homeland security has named generals as the people who are going to oversee this, not civilians. it is a violation and if you see the replication in terms of the war on terror it is what has created centers around the country to harmonize and have local law enforcement to do the bidd
and not just right now. and that really has a lot of meaning to us. and we have great sympathy for the fact that this is an enormously complicated process that they're, that they are going through. what we have asked of the fcc commissioners is more traction parent si -- transparency, more engagement. it might be conventional wisdom that if broadcasters want to stop this -- actually, i think it's in our interests to accelerate this to the degree possible while still getting it right. because this has enormous consequence to the nation that there is a dedicated and healthy broadcast band dedicated to broadcasting if we're serious about preserving video on a large scale that is free and that is local. these things are hugely important to people. in the information age, people still care about gathering around their big screens and watching sporting events or getting emergency information or staying up with the news. it comes there broadcasting in a very significant way. so we, we gave up a lott of spectrum -- a lot of spectrum when we went from analog to digital. we're being asked for more. b
discussions with my national security team. >> bill: the world waiting anxiously to see if the u.s. will punish syria for using chem cam weapons. we will have the latest on this important story. >> still too much apathy when the lives of people of color are too often valued less than the lives of white people. >> is that true? does the establishment in america devalue the lives of minorities? we will discuss that provocative question with laura i can gram. >> >> bill: and should american workers be paid more than they get on welfare? today fast food workers demonstrated for more money and that is the topic of my talking points memo. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone from massachusetts, the factor begins right now. ♪ ♪ hi, i'm bill o'reilly, reporting tonight from boston, thanks for watching us. the talking points memo on economic justice will be in the second segment this evening. first the lead story tonight the latest on syria. president obama has told pbs he hasn't made up his mind whether to launch military action against the assad regime for using poison gas
for them especially after the confession was played in the court. wisdom has that for us. >> it isn't about julio blanco garcia's guilt but his motivation. he says the crime was not premeditated. yesterday's interrogation tape could support his case. >> i don't know what happened. it was too many, i am so sorry. i didn't mean to. >> why are you crying? >> i have changed my life ever since then. god is not going to forgive what i did. >> sure he will. >> no. >> sure he will. >> julio blanco garcia stabbed vanessa pham june 27th 2010. julio blanco garcia's one-year-old daughter was in the car with him. fingerprints at an unrelated crime scene. according to the 27-year-old construction worker's investigation, after confronting him with surveillance video from the shopping center and fingerprints on the murder weapon. julio blanco garcia said he just snapped. >> where did you stab her? >> in the chest. >> how many times did you stab her? >> i don't remember. >> what was she doing when you stabbed her? >> she was crying. >> she was crying? >> okay. did she tell you to >> manning is expected to s
-3880 for democrats, and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also contact us through social media, @cspanwj is our twitter and appeared you consider e-mail if you'd like to "hill" newhe'll" -- savor this morning host: that is from the "hill" newspaper. and from "politico" this morning -- john boehner calls for a short-term continuing resolution. here's a little bit from the speaker from yesterday. [video clip] >> the appropriators have a tough job over the last couple of years. they have taken a lot of tough votes in their committee. so i understand the frustration that they are dealing with. but i just want to make clear -- the sequestration is going to remain in effect until the president agrees to cut some toorms that will allow us remove it. the president insisted on the sequester, and none of us wanted, none of us like it. there are smarter ways to cut spending. the house has moved twice over the last year and a half to replace the sequester. we saw no action in the united states senate. so if they want the sequester to go, we will have to get serious about our long
. this is the chairman of the nga. he will join us at 9:00. begins at 7:00 in the morning. the summer meeting takes place again in milwaukee. the activity is set to start shortly. d kumar sees on c-span starting momentarily. -- eu can see these on c-span starting momentarily. >> we are live this morning on c-span. we are here at the wisconsin sensor a couple of blocks west of the milwaukee river appeared governors are gathering here throughout a week and. livell breed bringing you coverage. they are supposed to start a couple of minutes ago. they are getting things together. we will be hearing from the governors about infrastructure. anthony fox will be on the panel as well as the as the chair of the house transportation committee. we are going to be taking your calls after that and then a true 30 p.m. eastern panel. we will be talking about how states are integrating into the local economy. -- awill have a panel bowl cannot 12:15 p.m.. we will be joining the governors tomorrow at 12:15 p.m. by thear's gathering governor of delaware. they will be here this morning. years nga nga,s scott walker. this is i
caps and makes it difficult for us to accomplish the goals we have for our country across a variety of fronts. i think there is a growing sense that there is a need to re-look at it. >> you do not have any idea of what the numbers are or some of the projects. i can live with it. >> with i am saying to you is that the situation is obviously very fluid. in our department, we happen to be ready for just about anything. >> thank you, mr. secretary. we are honored to have you with us. most governors recognize how important transportation is to their success in their states. as a former elected official, you understand that. it is economic development and the ability to expand economically. in the state of utah, we have stepped up our commitment to transportation in a significant way. we have put 500% more state money into state highways, roads, and into a augmenting the state system. we just completed 15 miles of interstate 15, expanding the lane capacity, hov lanes. we did it all without federal dollars. we are trying to put our resources where we think they need to be in the infrastruc
schools were now being used to haul them to segregated prison. before the day was over, almost 1000 children were in jail. a day later, another 1000 children joined the march. this time, the authorities resulted -- attacked by police dogs. at last on may 10, 1963, under protection from the federal government and from outraged world opinion, the leaders of birmingham accepted the demands of the freedom marchers. .. with the president to announce plans for the march on washington. in support of the civil rights act. >> june 12th, 1963 as everest was returning home for the naacp meeting member byron shot him in his driveway as he was getting out of his car. evers was killed instantly. ♪ ♪ >> randolph and fellow americans , the national urban league is honored to be a participant in this historic occasion. our presence here reflects not only the civil rights communities increasing the awareness of the urban league, but most important it says and i hope what and clear that while intelligence, maturity and strategy dictates a civil rights agency we use different methods and we are all
are limiting the requirement to retreat. use deadly force. >> 16 states currently have stand your ground law on the books. in maryland, individuals have a duty to retreat before considering and using deadly force. that could change of baltimore county republican delegate patrick madonna has his way. >> we are introducing legislation to create a stand your ground law in maryland, the strongest form of protection for crime victims and potential crime victims. >> it provides an exemption to the duty to retreat. stand your ground states have exemptions as well. kansas, this defense cannot be used during the commission of a crime. in north carolina, it cannot be used in circumstances that involve law enforcement or landlord disputes. >> when you have duty to retreat, a victim can be subject to a civil lawsuit or from a prosecution. >> a law signed by martin o'malley in 2010 provide civil immunity from damages when force or deadly force is used under reasonable circumstances. according to an analysis by the 10th of a times, florida's stand your ground law has allowed drug dealers to avoid murder c
kids asking for money for various causes. >> we focused on two organizations using children as fundraisers. here because a little while ago, one group was at this location but they left once it started rating. the children use bucket similar to this and they walk up to cars and trucks and ask for any types of contributions they can get that there is a lot of concern about how safe this really is. a donation.sts she appears to drop a coin and retrieves it from under the rear tire of this car stopped at a light. seconds later, traffic begins moving. it is incidents like this that worry drivers. atched children walk up to cars and trucks at various intersections. the kids, part of a summer program, run by the african heritage walkathon incorporated. >> we raise funds to give back to the community. >> victory swift says it started in 2003 and has raised $22,000 further groups working with till june. it has a walkathon as a fundraiser each year. permissionrents give to participate in the kids are trained and supervised to maintain safety. >> they are aware of the running does not
. >> virginia state police used automaticed license plate readers back in 2009. according to the dispatch the secret service requested it to be used at the entrance of the pentagon meant as an extra lar of security. the license plate readers used state wide since 2006 used to detect stolen cars and fugitives. >> the chaos and carnage in egypt is heightning debates to u.s. aid to the country. the u.s. gives 1.5 billion dollars a year to egypt's aid. aid to egypt temporarily stopped. that is not accurate. >> aid is on going and no determination or conclusion of that review has been reached at this point. >> there is a bucket of remaining money 585 million that has not been obligated. >> thousandands died in the last week in battles against the military and supporters of ousted president muhammad. >> a british newspaper says it was forceed sgroi information provide by edward snowden. this is days after the same sex partner of the guardian reporter covering the story was detain indeed a london airport. catherine has a look where things stand tonight. >> guardian's editor says british au
was that he took this brazen attack in the middle of the afternoon inside a crowded mall. >> police tell us the victim was not badly injury, but is obviously pretty shaken up. gray is now facing a number of charges including robbery, theft and assault. now to a situation we've been closely monitoring in baltimore county. businesses and residents fed up with destructive teens near the putty hill skate land. the violence usually happens at closing time on saturday nights. let's get to don champion who is live at the rink right now. >> no problems as of yet. you can see that the rink has let out for the night. i can tell you we have seen increase in the number of security guards out here, and also we've seen a number of officers patrolling the parking lot here. one thing is for sure, now that baltimore county officials have stepped in on the problems that have been happening here, neighbors are breathing a sigh of relief. >> that leads nowhere. >> cell phone video shows the weekly hassle neighbors of skate land have dealt with. droves and drefs of teens pouring out of the popular venue and too
lives for us and they're asked to do their job but because of a bad policy from the top that i described from mayor bloomberg those officers can be caught in a cycle of that humiliation that they don't want to be a party of either. trouble. how you explain that you have the right to do this to people. stop and frisk never should have been allowed. bloomberg knows better than that. thatheard some people say we stop crime. i can go door to door and stick it in. we cannot do that. i wish you would emphasize that we cannot allow police officers to do that because the constitution says you cannot. >> i appreciate the point. that is one more point from the judges ruling. judge's ruling. it may lower the crime rate but it is unconstitutional. that is not where we begin, that is where we end. situation, you can lock down an entire city. in that particular situation, that made sense will stop -- sense. legal and moral problems. we cannot look at these issues through the narrow problem -- prism of what could reduce crime. we have to look at public safety and the fact that we are a democr
eastern. be sure to join us this evening for another of our town hall meetings. the focus today is unimplemented asian of the affordable care act. administration will delay implementation of the section of the law covering limits to out- of-pocket costs for consumers. we will check in on congressional town hall meetings around the nation and what questions members of congress are getting from their constituents. we'll get an update on court challenges to the law and check out the rollout of healthcare exchanges which is opposed to take effect by january 1 of next year. here is a brief art of tonight's program. i don't think you understand the law you are in charge of executing and enforcing. the clawback where you limit how much a person pays back, that is only a person who is eligible for a subsidy if their income changes in the year in which the subsidy takes place. person, -- if a person gets a subsidy they are not eligible for which will clearly be the case if your major enforcement tool, the employer mandate is not in place, the law requires you clawback 100 % of that subsi
-year-old turned to us and asked what that means. we discovered for to quickly that that is not an easy concept to explain to a five-year-old. we said, it is something that you believe in, that you spend time on. that and lookut at us and said, kind of like we stand for barack obama? we said, absolutely. [applause] of course, after my wife got done patting ourselves on the back for teaching our five-year- old who the right choice in the presidential race was, i thought about that. what i stand for, what our neighborhood stands for, our communities stand for, and what our state stands for. it is things like an economy built from the middle out. healthcare for everybody. the idea that our communities are stronger because of the bonds we share and the answers to the challenges we face lie in the future and not the past. a lot of times campaigns become about little things, doors to knock, phone calls to make, as on tv, twitter feeds, facebook posts, but everyone should allow campaigns to become about bigger questions. this is one of those campaigns. the question to me is, are we going to continue t
are not acquiring human capital in the form of education and skill sets to use charles' very wonderful phrase that is going to build this country and build up self-esteem and self-worth of the people of this country. we have a whole culture that's not starving but it's starving for self-esteem. they resort to violence, drug addiction, premarital and extramarital sex. we have a whole culture that is just dying from lack of self-esteem and that's from lack of work. >> people like him perpetuating it, right, adam? >> i know you don't want to comment on that for me. >> i don't, indeed. stick around, we're going to take a break. >>> in the meantime, no way to the nsa. why the lawmakers are saying the best way to defund the agency right now. the "cashin' in" crew is all over it at the bottom of the hour. >>> one of the largest stock exchanges stopped cold for three hours. they're calling it technical difficulties. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of course i had no idea what it was. i felt like my feet were going to sleep. it progressed from there to burning... to like 1,000 bees that wer
are on board with largelyl action there, countries that are siding with the u.s. are calling for more diplomacy. that reported in the papers as well. we want to ask about the role of the international community on potential actions in syria and what purpose they serve. if you want to give your thoughts on the international on onety's role in syria of our social media outlets, you can do so on twitter, @cspanwj. you can always send us an e-mail -- guardian" from "the newspaper this morning from the united kingdom. "threat of commons revolt forces allies to delay syria missile strike" is the headline. "whitehall sources indicate that the u.s., which had planned to launch the strikes by the weekend, may be prepared to revive a backup plan to delay strikes until tuesday when the president is due to set out for the g 20 summit in russia. in an effort to build support for punitive strikes, the u.s. and u.k. will publish a joint summary of the intelligence which they say points toward the assad regime's response ability for the poison gas attack of august 21 in eastern damascus that
by giving us a call, 202, 585, 3881 -- for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. facebook or us on send us an e-mail. or to send us a tweet. action prompted at embassies, that is the headline. "based on unspecified information, the warning comes after the state department ordered the closing of 2100 embassies in the arabian peninsula." let me read to a portion of this. "the part in the state warned citizens to the continued potential for terrorist attacks, particularly in the middle east or north africa." host: that is from the state department. matt lee, who follows the state department for the associated press, is with us on the phone. what news can you tell us? caller: there is not much new that we know since thursday or friday, when we receive the notice of the embassy closures. the alert came out on friday. right now we are kind of in a wait and see mode to see what, if anything is actually going to occur today, obviously clearly a day of great concern. also to the rest of this
and aggressively gets to the bottom of it. congressman goudi joins us. thank you for being here on a friday evening. let me ask you. when you first heard of this news last night, were you surprised or in line with what you thought was probably happening? >> well, dana, i would like to tell you i'm still surprised when government disappoints and when there's evidence we can't trust people in positions of power but i'm beyond that point. i was surprised at the pervas e pervasiveness of it. thousands of incidents. here's what does surprise me. i know having three branches of government is tedious sometimes. i know that that is disappointing to the executive branch. but i wonder how many of my colleagues in congress were briefed that there were thousands of errors made with respect to this program because i have a sneaking suspicion the number is zero. that's how many of my colleagues were told ahead of time before we had to learn from a leaker to a newspaper that there were thousands of violations. >> so, i believe that congressman rogers office said they did see the memo are regular reports but if t
a ton of energy. the iphone uses more energy than that of a refrigerator. 322 kilowatts an hour, the average iphone, 361, that includes the wi-fi, data usage and charging. it's not just smart phone, out of all the new technology we have, it uses about 10% of the world's energy pie. to put that another way, all the new technology together uses 50% more energy than global aviation uses. analysts say that the need for electricity will just keep growing because who knows how many devices or what types of devices we'll have in 20 years and we keep them on all the time. think about it, lighting and air conditioning you turn off but you don't turn off your phone or your dvr box. >>> facebook could become the new pay pal of the internet. they want to partner up with current shopping apps to just sign into their facebook account. to use the service, shoppers would have to save their credit or debit card information to facebook. some say that facebook will have a hard time going up against more established sites like he bay. >>> you think you have heard this before, obesity is bad for you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 425 (some duplicates have been removed)